Max Roach: The Duo Sessions



A few more clips today of one of my all-time favorites, Max Roach shown here in some various duet situations:















Max Roach !

And...We're back



Hello everyone. It's been awhile since my last post as it has been an eventful 10 days having played across Western Canada with an exciting eleven piece band, performing all the music and arrangements from the seminal album "Art Pepper+11". Overall our small tour was a resounding success. I'd like to thank Dean McNeill for going above and beyond the call of duty in organizing this tour as it was no small feat at all. We drove many kilometers, shared many laughs and played some great music. Fortunately our show was recorded by the CBC during our performance in Saskatoon at the University of Saskatchewan so we'll be able to share some of this music with the rest of the world in the coming months.

There wasn't much time for blogging as I didn't travel with my laptop and only had my iPhone to communicate with the outside world. But here are a few things that caught my attention during my rare downtime while on the road:

-Drummer, blogger and harmonica whiz (!) Ted Warren continues his series of great interviews over at his blog Trap'd this time featuring tenor saxophonist Jerry Bergonzi. Bergonzi had the following interesting comment to say about the importance of studying rhythm:

"I think that everyone should study drums as time and rhythm are the most important things in playing. As you told me once, "It is Harmony and Melody that have fucked up music" I really took that to heart and I try to play with as little melody and harmony as possible now. I have even stripped down my tenor so it only plays 5 notes now."

Food for thought, indeed.

I was fortunate to hear Bergonzi play in Toronto in the basement of some posh private society club a couple of years ago with Ted at the drum helm along with Mike Downes on bass and Brian Dickinson on piano. The playing was, of course, phenomenal but the rhythm section was absolutely amazing in itself. A perfect example of how it's supposed to be done...

-I spent much of my time over the past ten days driving across Alberta/Saskatchewan/Manitoba in the company of saxophonist's Jim Brenan, Bill Prouten and Greg Gatien. So we listened to ALOT of Michael Brecker, Ralph Bowen, a good fill of early Duke Ellington (from the Blanton/Webster band era courtesy of Bill) and a nice dose of 70's funk. I also learned alot about tenor mouthpieces, ligatures and saxophone vibrato. I love hanging out with musicians that like to talk shop!

-Drummer Willie Jones III is also fun to listen to and watch. Here's a couple clips of him unleashing, taken by a couple of amateur videographers:





-Another interesting clip that's been making the rounds over at cymbalholics.com featuring John Riley playing through perhaps one of the most impressive collections of vintage K. Zildjian cymbals I've ever seen (!):



-And last but not least former Globe & Mail Jazz critic Mark Miller sent me this amazing footage of saxophonist Lucky Thompson playing with none other than the great Kenny Clarke on drums:



-Finally, a few people I'd like to thank for their music and for being overall really nice human beings: Dean McNeill, Dave Morgan, Brad Shigeta, Jeff Preslaff, Carsten Rubeling, Greg Gatien, Jim Brenan, Bill Prouten, Will Bonness, John Hyde, Jim Head, CBC Radio, the University of Saskatchewan, Brandon University, the Yardbird Suite, the Beatniq Jazz & Social Club, the University of Regina, Campbell Collegiate, Mr. & Mrs. McNeill, Kevin Marsh, Jennifer McAllister, Nick Fanner, Kathy Anderson, Brent Ghiglione, Mayfair United Church, the McNeill's in Sherwood Park and Roy Sydiaha.

It's good to be back. More regular posts forthcoming...

Trio Stendhal - Earthsound

László Dés founded the Hungarian jazz band Trio Stendhal with Ferenc Snétberger and Kornél Horváth. They played chamber music in a unique line-up and had extraordinary success all over the world. The band toured in Austria, Italy, Spain and other countries of Europe, but even in India. - www.info. bmc.hu

Artist: Trio Stendhal
Album: Earthsound
Year: 1991
Quality: eac-flac, cue, log, artw.
Label: Tom Tom Records (2009)
Runtime: 44:30

Tracks:
1.  Gipsy Mountain (Ferenc Snétberger) 6:06
2.  Shanti (Laszlo Des/Ferenc Snétberger) 5:43
3.  Earthsound (Laszlo Des/Ferenc Snétberger/Kornel Horvath) 7:29
4.  Theme For Angela (Ferenc Snétberger) 5:27
5.  Fanny & My Father (Laszlo Des) 5:09
6.  Galima (Laszlo Des/Kornel Horvath) 4:18
7.  Out Of Brazil (Laszlo Des/Ferenc Snétberger/Kornel Horvath) 8:18
8.  Lullaby For All Children (Ferenc Snétberger) 1:56

Personnel:
Laszlo Des (Tenor and Soprano Saxophone)
Ferenc Snétberger (Guitar)
Kornel Horvath (Percussion)

Chuck Mangione - The Feeling's Back

Chuck Mangione laid low throughout much of the '90s, perhaps the end result of a disappointing string of albums for Columbia during the '80s. He returned to the road in 1997 and evidently it was a positive experience, since he returned to the studio the following year to cut The Feeling's Back. For all intents and purposes, The Feeling's Back is a comeback album, finding Mangione returning to the smooth, melodic style of Feels So Good, but laying off the sappy pop tendencies that dogged his '80s efforts. Although the end result is a little monotonous -- many of the tracks are quiet and slowly swinging, blending together into one long track -- it's charmingly laid-back, mellow and melodic, all of the things that brought Mangione fame and fortune in the '70s. There isn't a whole lot in the way of "real" jazz here -- the solos are extensions of the themes, and they never stand apart from the lite groove -- but this has the "feeling" that Mangione fans have been waiting to feel again. And that's enough to make it a successful comeback.  - by Stephen Thomas Erlewine, AMG

I discovered Chuck Mangione in 1974, my freshman year at C.U. He was the darling of a local jazz station, long since vanished from the airwaves. I saw Chuck and his quartet at the legendary Tulage's on The Hill, in Boulder. I was close enough to touch the band and was blown away. The music was direct, the melodies flowed easily, and musicianship was second to none. I followed Chuck through college. The next time I saw him was with the full orchestra and Ester Saterfield at C.U.'s Mackey auditorium. The music was still great - Belavia had just been released, but it was more commercial. Chuck had been discovered by the masses, and the music seemed to be written more for the masses than for himself, and, while great, was strained. The Feeling is Back will probably disappoint those who only knew Chuck once he caught on with the "smooth jazz" format stations, but it will thrill those who loved Chuck's early work. No orchestra, a very tight group, and a lyric command of the flugel horn that demonstrates Chuck's technique has only improved with age. The new material, too, is top flight, especially Chuck's tunes, such as Once Upon a Love Time. Effortless, beautiful, naturally flowing melody performed with unparalleled musicianship. Given the commercial direction Chuck's music took after Chase the Clouds Away, I thought I was taking a flier on buying this disc. What I found is nothing short of a modern masterpiece. The Feeling is Back . . . way back. - by A Customer, Amazon.com

Artist: Chuck Mangione
Album: The Feeling's Back
Year: 1998
Quality: eac-flac, cue, log, artw.
Label: Chesky (High Resolution Technology, 1999)
Runtime: 57:00

Tracks:
1.  Mountain Flight (Toninho Horta) 4:51
2.  Consuelo's Love Theme (Chuck Mangione) 7:39
3.  Leonardo's Lady (Chuck Mangione) 6:36
4.  Fotografia (Antonio Carlos Jobim) 6:05
5.  Quase (Mario Adnet/Carlos Sandroni) 3:34
6.  Aldovia (Chuck Mangione) 5:06
7.  Once Upon A Love Time (Chuck Mangione) 5:59
8.  Manha De Carnaval (Luis Bonfa/Francois Llenas/Antonio Maria) 8:25
9.  Maracangalha (Dorival Cyammi) 3:51
10.  Le Vie En Rose (Mack David/Louis Gugliemi/Edith Piaf) 4:50
 
Personnel:
Chuck Mangione (Flugelhorn)
Cliff Korman (Piano and Keyboards)
Jay Azzolina (Guitar)
Paulo Braga (Drums)
Café (Percussion)
David Finck (Double Bass and Bass Guitar)
Kip Reid (Bass Guitar) - 3,7
Sarah Carter (Cello)
Gerry Niewood (Flute and Alto Flute)
Maucha Adnet (Vocals)
Jackie Presti (Vocals)
Annette Sanders (Vocals)

Native Ground - One Fine Mama

One Fine Mama is a new release, by Native Ground, that achieves a unique synthesis of diverse cultures. Recorded live in a concert hall in France, this remarkable blend of aboriginal didgeridoo, African percussion, marimba and guitar creates music with an intense pulse and earthy melodies. Gordy Ryan (percussion) has performed and recorded with Baba Olatunji, Mickey Hart, Gabrielle Roth, Airto and Carlos Santana. Al Schackman (marimba and guitars) is currently the guitarist and musical director for the legendary Nina Simone. Gary Thomas (didgeridoo) has performed and recorded with Tim Wheaater and Gabrielle Roth... - from AMG

Artist: Native Ground
Album: One Fine Mama
Year: 1992
Quality: eac-flac, cue, log, artw.
Label: Raven (1993)
Runtime: 56:10

Tracks:
1.  One Fine Mama 5:27 
2.  Sister's Gonna Dance Now 6:03 
3.  Side by Side 5:46 
4.  Dreamwalker 4:29 
5.  Within the Volcano 4:58 
6.  Ancestral Spirit 8:40 
7.  Embers 5:49 
8.  Urban Warrior 3:52 
9.  Midnight Crossing 3:16 
10.  Open Sky 7:44 
All compositions Gordy Ryan, Al Schackman, Gary Thomas

Personnel:
Gordy Ryan (Percussion)
Al Schackman (Guitar, Balafon)
Gary Thomas (Didgeridoo)

Outlook Festival !011 - DrumAndBass.RO Forums

Early line-up released.Click the image to open in full size.Click the image to open in full size.DUBSTEP: SKREAM BENGA MALA COKI LOEFAH THE BUG & FLOWDAN HATCHA MISTAJAM PLASTICIAN N-TYPE DISTANCE SCUBA PINCH QUEST SILKIE CHEF ADDISON GROOVE JAKES KROMESTAR JACK SPARROW EMALKAY CYRUS TRUE TIGER GOTH TRAD IKONIKA RSD (ROB SMITH) TUNNIDGE TRUTH FLUX PAVILION JAY 5IVE RAZOR REKTA SYNKRO INDIGO LOST CHIMPO GEORGE FITZGERALD BUNZERO NOISSES DUFFSTEP CONFUSION DJS T_!

(MACABRE UNIT) VERSA DUB BOY ICICLE BENNY PAGE RUCKSPIN FALTY DL RATTUS RATTUS KLOSE ONE VECTRA CAPTAIN CRUNCH & REEPS ONE THE Tuesday CLUB DJS RAMADANMAN / PEARSON SOUND UNTOLD DUB MAFIA PAUL SPYMANIA SUBMOTION ORCHESTRA SHACKLETON ROSKA BEN UFO PANGAEA GIRL UNIT BRACKLESMCS: SGT. POKES CRAZY D JUAKALI G DOUBLEDUB / REGGAE: BARRINGTON LEVY TWINKLE BROTHERS DAVID RODIGAN IRATION STEPPAS GENTLEMAN'S DUB CLUB MUNGO'S HI-FI VIBRONICS CHANNEL ONE TROJAN SOUNDSYSTEM DISRUPT SOOM T DUBKASM PRINCE FATTY OBF MAFFI FIREHOUSE SOUND DADDY FREDDY SOLO BANTON STAND HIGH PATROL REGGAE ROAST RIDDIM TUFFA NICE UP SOUNDSYSTEM DIGITRON COUNT SKYLARKIN DANMAN RESONATORS EARTHPIPE RACKNRUIN THE HEATWAVEHIP-HOP / GRIME: PHAROAHE MONCH TERROR DANJAH MAKI BANTON RUSTIE SCRATCHA DVA ALEXANDER NUT FOREIGN BEGGARS NEWHAM GENERALS JEHST BROKE'N'ENGLISH PHI Life CYPHER D DOUBLE E P MONEY BADNESS KIDKANEVIL DOT ROTTEN LOGAN SAMA J.J. VERB T FLIPTRIX BLACKS PAUL PRE CAPITAL R MARCUS NASTY L-VIS 1990 BOK BOKDRUM & BASS: CONGO NATTY DBRIDGE BREAK NICKY BLACKMARKET S.P.Y. COMMIX SPECTRASOUL ALIX PEREZ ICICLE ROCKWELL SURVIVAL LOXY INK NYMFO BENNY PAGE LIONDUB LOGAN D ANT TC1 DLR SKEPTICAL AL SONAR STEPPAMCS: STAMINA MC SP:MC MC ADGARAGE / TECHNO: ZED BIAS EL-B MOXIE ELIPHINO MARTYN MJ COLE ONEMAN KYLE HALLELECTRONICA / BEATS: HUDSON MOHAWKE KODE 9 & THE SPACEAPE LIVE BENJI B RAS KWAME INTRODUCING PERFORM ENDTRODUCING COOLY G LONE SEIJI BULLION HIDDEN ORCHESTRA UNITED VIBRATIONS TROPICS KORELESS KELVIN BROWN EDDY RAMICH ARP 101 MIZZ BEATS GUIDO SPACE DIMENSION CONTROLLER LIL SILVA DOC DANEEKA FLOATING POINTS MOSCA More TBA. Over 300 acts. 9 Parties. More, tickets etc. on www.outlookfestival.com. Cam cel mai mare de pana acum. Line-up in mare parte excelent, cu mici scapari as usual. Big. PS: Impartirea nu e pe scene sau ceva, e pe genuri si e cam amestecata. Early line-up.

Toumani Diabate - Kaira

Toumani Diabate, like Foday Musa Suso, is regarded as one of the greatest living virtuosos on the kora, the 21-string West African harp-lute. Coming from a prominent musical family in the country of Mali, Diabate showcases his reputation as an inventive and lyrical performer on Kaira, his first solo album. The five pieces represent some of the classic kora works, and, at five to ten minutes in length, they allow Diabate plenty of time to stretch out and reveal his dazzling virtuosity. The tunes are all built around a solid bassline and a basic melodic theme around which Diabate improvises, producing a richly ornamented sound that is lively, fluid and engaging. - from AMG
Artist: Toumani Diabate
Album: Kaira
Year: 1987
Quality: eac-flac, cue, log, artw.
Label: Hannibal (1988)
Runtime: 28:31

Tracks:
1.  Alla L'aa Ke (Traditional) 5:09
2.  Jarabi (Toumani Diabate) 3:35
3.  Kaira (Toumani Diabate) 5:44
4.  Konokoba (Toumani Diabate) 7:22
5.  Tubaka (Toumani Diabate) 6:39

Personnel:
Toumane Diabate (Kora)

David Murray - Ballads

Ballads is one of David Murray's finest records. Like the three other excellent DIW releases that came from the same productive New York session of January 1988 (Spirituals, Deep River, and Lovers), it contains a mix of originals by Murray, pianist Dave Burrell, and drummer Ralph Peterson Jr., and it also includes fine bass work by Fred Hopkins. The rapport these players have on this record is stunning. They effortlessly move through a program of cool yet smart after-hours explorations that, in spite of the multi-layered arrangements, come out sounding almost artless. Of the six originals, two are penned by Murray: the touching, melancholic waltz "Love in Resort" and the graceful, pathos-driven piece "Ballad for the Black Man." Murray displays his usual inventiveness of phrasing and tone on these and the rest of the album's numbers but thankfully suppresses his penchant for gratuitous outbursts, keeping his solos flowing. This sort of studied, yet loose playing is heard from all the quartet members, including Peterson, who, like Murray, also has the tendency to eat up the scenery. Peterson also contributes the sophisticated "Lady in Black," which elicits some of Murray's most creative playing of the date. The fine, mostly straightforward originals by Murray and Peterson are complimented by Burrell's rhythmically sophisticated pieces like the tango-calypso hybrid "Valley Talk" and multi-tempo boss nova "Paradise Five." The set ends with Murray joining Burrell on the pianist's bravura duet "Sarah's Lament." Ballads is an excellent set on all levels and even the sound is superb. One of the best albums of the '80s. - by Stephen Cook, AMG


Artist: David Murray
Album: Ballads
Year: 1988
Quality: eac-flac, cue, log, artw.
Label: DIW Records
Runtime: 46:32


Tracks:
1.  Valley Talk (Dave Burrell) 7:14
2.  Love In Resort (David Murray) 4:44
3.  Ballad for the Black Man (David Murray) 11:02
4.  Paradise Five (Dave Burrell) 8:19
5.  Lady in Black (Ralph Peterson Jr.) 8:00
6.  Sarah's Lament (Dave Burrell) 7:11

Personnel:
David Murray (Tenor Saxophone)
Dave Burrell (Piano)
Fred Hopkins (Double Bass)
Ralph Peterson Jr. (Drums)

The Buschmeyer-McCaslin-Stoll B3 Organ Project



THE BUSCHMEYER-McCASLIN-STOLL B3 JAZZ ORGAN PROJECT

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 2nd 2010 8:00pm

THE CLIFF BUNGALOW MISSION COMMUNITY CENTRE

2201 CLIFF STREET SW

$15/$10 (for students and community members)

info: 403.650.7695 www.cliffbungalowmission.com

The Buschmeyer-McCaslin-Stoll B3 Organ Project is the latest collaboration between Calgary jazz artists Ralf Buschmeyer on guitar, Derek Stoll on keyboards and Jon McCaslin on drums. Evoking the sounds of the classic jazz organ trios of the 1960s, these artists have come together to present an evening of grooving and hard swinging music inspired by such artists as Wes Montgomery, Grant Green, George Benson, Stanley Turrentine, Jimmy Smith and Larry Young. The groups repertoire will focus on classic jazz standards and compositions drawn from the classic jazz organ trio era.

About the Cliff Bungalow-Mission Jazz Series:

After an exciting start the CBM Jazz concert series is now in its second season. Organized by local jazz enthusiast, saxophonist and composer Jan Mulder, the monthly series of concerts features some of Calgary's best jazz musicians and ensembles and provides an ideal opportunity to spend a relaxing evening. The concerts are conducted in the quiet listening and family friendly environment of the Cliff Bungalow-Mission community hall and take place on the first wednesday of every month. Each 2 hour performance starts at 8 pm so everybody can get a good night sleep and be rested the next morning. Coffee, tea, and beverages are served. There is a $15 cover fee for each event ($10 for community association members and students). Tickets are sold at the door. Call 403-650-7695 for more info.

Barbara Thompson's Paraphernalia - Breathless

"This album was conceived as a series of street moods, hence the titles, short, to the point, and reminiscent of typical street slang... Listening to "Bad Blues", you have to imagine the large metropolis in the early hours with neon lights glimmering off wet pavements an the night people going about their business... "Sax Rap" features Barbara's original talking saxophone, instead of the more romance amidst the chaos of the city... "You must Be Jokin'" is a piece based on a typically English phrase, and dedicated to Ronnie Scott, his incredibly funny jokes and his internationally famous Jazz Club in the heart of London's Soho... where you would probably sit sipping that long cool drink while tapping your toes to "Jaunty"... "Cheeky" mirrors the bright costumes and festive atmosphere of any big City's Carnival week... "Squiffy" reflects the feeling of being high on anything that turns you on... "Gracey" is both graceful and folky, yearning for the neauty and peace so hard to find in the concrete jungle... from the CD cover

Artist: Barbara Thompson's Paraphernalia
Album: Breathless
Year: 1990-91
Quality: eac-flac, cue, log, artw.
Label: veraBra (1991)
Runtime: 61:44

Tracks:
1.  Breathless 9:25 
2.  Sax Rap 6:48 
3.  Jaunty 4:14 
4.  You Must Be Jokin' 6:03 
5.  Squiffy 6:57 
6.  Bad Blues 3:33 
7.  Cheeky 6:40 
8.  Gracey 6:26 
9.  Breathless (Short Cut) 3:53 
10.  Sax Rap (Short Cut) 4:23 
11.  Cheeky (Short Cut) 3:17 
All compositions by Barbara Thompson

Personnel:
Barbara Thompson (Alto and Soprano Saxophones, Alto Flute)
Jon Hiseman (Drums)
Peter Lemer (Piano, Synthesizer)
Malcolm MacFarlane (Electric and Acoustic Guitar)
Phil Mulford (Bass Guitar)
Hossam Ramzy (Percussion) - 1
Noel Langley (Trumpet) - 2,7
Ashley Slater (Trombone) - 2,7
Frank Holder (Congas and Bongos) - 7

Different Theologians on the Holy Spirit

Here are some theologians and some "pithy" statements describing their pneumatology.

Enjoy!
Chelle

1. Augustine: The Spirit is the bond of Love between the Father and the Son.

2. Irenaeus: The Son and the Spirit are the two hands of God.

3. St. Basil: The Spirit is the perfecting cause.


4. Richard of St. Victor: The Holy Spirit is the motor outward of God.


5. Wolfhart Pannenberg: The Spirit is a force field. (NOT like on Star Trek!)

6. Jurgen Moltmann: "wherever there is a passion for life, there the Spirit of God is operating" (Karkkainen, Pneumatology, 126)

7. Karl Barth: the Spirit is always in relation to Christ, mediating Christ (the Word of Christ) to people's hearts

8. Clark Pinnock: The Flame of Love OR The sex dude... 

9. John Zizioulas: Eastern Orthodox. The Trinity as an Ontology of Communion. The Spirit and the Son work in parallel: "The work of the Spirit is not the subordinate to the work of the Son, nor is Pentecost a continuation of the incarnation but rather its sequel, its result." (Karkkainen, Pneumatology, 109)

10. Elizabeth Johnson: The Holy Spirit as Sophia, or wisdom.


11. Karl Rahner: The Spirit has a universal orientation. He talks about 'anonymous Christians', as people who are Christians but just don't know it yet. In other words, the Spirit is at work in them.

12. Robert Jenson: Lutheran theologian who believes that the Spirit is moving Christianity back to being one Holy catholic/Catholic Church.
13. Stan Grenz: We are made in the image of God, therefore we have been created for community. The Spirit constitutes and dwells in the Community of God.

14. Elizabeth Schussler-Fiorenza: scholar who rigorously and passionately argues for the recognition of women in the establishing and forming of the Christian tradition. The Holy Spirit moved women into prominent positions in ministry back then, why not today?

15. Mark I. Wallace: Green or Ecological Pneumatology.


16. Karen Baker-Fletcher: The Spirit is at work today in our lives and is the resurrection (as in the resurrection of Jesus) and the resurrecting power (as in for us) of God, even in the darkest places of evil and oppression. 

Keith Jarrett - Treasure Island

Originally an Impulse LP that surfaced on MCA as a straight reissue on CD, this fine recording features pianist Keith Jarrett's best regular group. Dewey Redman is heard from on tenor, bassist Charlie Haden, drummer Paul Motian and percussionists Guilherme Franco and Danny Johnson are superb in ensembles and guitarist Sam Brown guests on two selections. The emphasis is on the band's sound and Jarrett's rich melodies; he contributed eight originals to this enjoyable modern set. - by Scott Yanow, AMG

It's great to see this beautiful album back in print at an affordable price! I stumbled upon an earlier edition in a bargain bin while record shopping one day about 20 years ago. I didn't know much about it, but glancing at the CD jacket I read the names of Paul Motian, Dewey Redman, and Charlie Haden. That was a good enough indicator for me, so I snatched it up and headed for the register. I'm no music critic or educated musician, I just love soulful music coming from the heart, and this is it! The other extremely brief review here mentions the word organic, and that's as close as a one word description could be. The music on Treasure Island is earthy, gospel infused modern jazz, informed by folk music influences, and driven by the spirit of improvisation. Oh, and Ornette Coleman too! This record is also full of lovely melodies I find truly inspiring. Keith Jarrett, Dewey Redman, Charlie Haden, and Paul Motian are all supreme artists possessing unique musical voices , and this was a very special group. They made a number of other recordings for the Impulse label, but Treasure Island is probably the most appealing and accessible album for the uninitiated.The quartet is augmented by Guilherme Brown and Danny Johnson on percussion. Sam Brown plays guitar on the title track, and Sister Fortune. - by Star Thrower, Amazon.com

Artist: Keith Jarrett
Album: Treasure Island
Year: 1974
Quality: eac-flac, cue, log, artw.
Label: Impulse (1988)
Total time: 44:14

Tracks:
1.  The Rich (and The Poor) 9:23 
2.  Blue Streak 2:34 
3.  Fullsuvollivus (Fools Of All Of Us) 6:28 
4.  Treasure Island 4:19 
5.  Introduction & Yaqui Indian Folk Song (K. Jarrett/Traditional 2:17 
6.  Le Mistral 9:22 
7.  Angles (Without Edges) 5:22 
8.  Sister Fortune 4:26 
All compositions by Keith Jarrett

Personnel:
Keith Jarrett (Piano, Soprano Saxophone and Osi Drum)
Dewey Redman (Tenor Saxophone and Tambourine)
Charlie Haden (Double Bass)
Paul Motian (Drums and Percussion)
Guilherme Franco (Percussion)
Danny Johnson (Percussion)
Sam Brown (Guitar) - 4,8

Gabor Szabo - Femme Fatale

Released in 1981 on a small Hungarian label, this 1978 session recorded in Hollywood is the guitarist's final record. "Out of the Night" interestingly pairs him with pianist Chick Corea. But the remainder of the record is a standard late-'70s fusion date without Corea, highlighted by the Return to Forever intrigue of "A Thousand Times." - by Douglas Payne, AMG

Jazz guitar greats have always been in short supply. The father of the instrument was Charlie Christian who died in his early 20's, the incredible Wes Montgomery died very young, thankfully we still have the inimitable and superbly tastefull Kenny Burrell, and the fine player-vocalists George Benson and John Pizzarelli. Alas, Hungarian born Gabor Szabo died young also, but no one brought more unique expressiveness and pop excitement, and by his recordings, still does than the Gypsy man Gabor. His mystic-jazz-exotica is instantly recognizable and delicious as well. The fact is, anything he left us from the incredibly creative 60's is a delicacy still to be savored. - by B. London, Amazon.com

Artist: Gabor Szabo
Album: Femme Fatale
Year: 1978
Quality: eac-flac, cue, log, artw.
Label: Mambo Records (1998)
Runtime: 36:39

Tracks:
1.  Femme Fatale (Gabor Szabo) 3:41
2.  Zingaro (Antonio Carlos Jobim) 9:21
3.  Serena (James Harrah) 8:17
4.  A Thousand Times (Gabor Szabo) 8:09
5.  Out of the Night (Chick Corea) 7:09

Personnel:
Gabor Szabo (Guitar)
Chick Corea (Piano)
Jim Keltner (Drums)
Paulinho da Costa (Percussion)
Jerry Hey (Trumpet, Trombone)
Kim Hutchcroft (Saxophone)
Bud Nuanez (Guitar)
Ken Wild (Bass Guitar)

On The Road - January 2011



I'm headed on a tour of Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba imminently with trumpeter/composer/swell guy Dean McNeill and an ensemble consisting of many of Western Canada's finest Jazz artists. We'll be performing music from the seminal album "Art Pepper+11" and newly commissioned compositions and arrangements written by members of the band specifically for this tour.
Come by and say hello if you're in the neighborhood!


The Dean McNeill "Art Pepper+11" Western Canadian Tour

Featuring:

Dean McNeill, Dave Morgan - Trumpets
Greg Gatien, Jim Brenan, Bill Prouten - Saxophones
Brad Shigeta, Jeff Presslaff, Carsten Rubeling - Trombones
Will Bonness - Piano
John Hyde - Bass
Jon McCaslin - Drums (pretending to be Mel Lewis...)


Tour Dates:

Saturday, January 22 - The Yardbird Suite - Edmonton, Alberta

Sunday, January 23 - Mayfair United Church, Jazz Vespers Series - Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

Monday, January 24 - Ivy Restaurant (Jam Session) - Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

Tuesday, January 25 - University of Saskatchewan (CBC Recording for Canada Live) - Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

Wednesday, January 26 - Brandon University - Brandon, Manitoba

Thursday, January 27 - Clinics at Campbell Collegiate - Regina, Saskatchewan

Friday, January 28 - Guest Lecturer, University of Regina - Regina, Saskatchewan

Saturday, January 29 - The Beatniq Jazz & Social Club (with the McNeill/Shigeta Quinet) - Calgary, Alberta

*There won't be much blogging over the course of the next week or so but I'll drop by when I can and give you all an update...

Gordon Fee: Gender and Translation

As I was poking around the web for a picture of Gordon Fee, I found this article on Gender and Translation. This is a co-authored piece with Mark Strauss. I thought that some of you might be interested in this discussion. Enjoy!


Gordon Fee

A few people asked if I would put the Fee quotes from this week's lecture on Kenosis up on the class blog. Since I'm not sure which quotes or ideas provoked further contemplation, I'll just put up my lecture and notes. If there were other quotes or ideas that you were interested in exploring, just let me know. Don't forget that all of my lectures and slides are posted in the class folder.

Gordon Fee: Defining Kenosis

Biblical theologian, Gordon Fee, can help us establish a different understanding of kenosis.[1] In his commentary on Philippians, Fee points out that the phrases ‘did not consider equality with God something to be grasped’ and ‘made himself nothing’ function together in the poetic form of the hymn. These two ideas play off each other, saying something similar.

Unfortunately, this pairing of phrases has often been translated or understood to mean that Jesus gave up or emptied out his divinity or something vital to his being. As if Jesus, in the incarnation, was like a bag that could only carry so much stuff and had to be emptied out in order to enable the incarnation. All the God-stuff had to be taken out of the bag.[2] Fee argues that the first phrase ‘did not consider equality with God something to be grasped,’ points to the reality of Jesus, that he truly was God. This identity as God was not something that he desired; it was always his from eternity.[3] He also notes that some commentators translate ‘to grasp’ [harpagmos] in a manner more unto being. That being God, Jesus did not grasp or seize, because that is not the way God is. Power, leadership, kingship is about service not about the grasping of power.[4] Fee seems to agree with this idea that the life of Christ reveals what God-likeness is. “Rather, his ‘equality with God’ found its truest expression when ‘he emptied himself’.”[5]
Fee asserts that the primary theological mistake in this passage has hinged on the assumption that if Jesus emptied himself [ekenosen] he emptied himself of something, rather than it being a statement of identity. This person, Jesus Christ, did not grasp at equality with God (he was God) and the one who didn’t grasp poured himself out by taking the form of a slave.[6] “God is not an acquisitive being, grasping and seizing, but self-giving for the sake of other.”[7] Thus this passage is talking more about the nature of who Jesus is rather than what was given up.[8]
Fee’s argument reminds me of the concept of perichoresis, as a gifting and giving of being from the Father, Son and the Spirit. This self-giving is the way of God. Thus, Christ’s self-giving and emptying is an eternal a continuous way of being. This is not given up in the incarnation—this can be seen in how he relates to the Father and the Spirit throughout his ministry. Jesus is given from the Father the renewed gift of the Holy Spirit at his baptism. This is the inauguration of his ministry. It is interesting that in the synoptic Gospels, immediately after his baptism, Jesus is lead by the Spirit into the desert to be tempted by Satan. It is here that he truly does not grasp after power and authority. He takes no privileges—because the rule of the world was his by right—and remains a servant. He does not take the easy way toward Lordship that is offered to him. And, as the Christ hymns proclaims, it is in this way of not grasping and of pouring himself out as a servant for the sake of others that Jesus is exalted as Lord over all of creation.



[1] Gordon Fee, Paul’s Letter to the Philippians, 191-214, esp. 210-214.
[2] Though this is not really Kathryn Tanner’s articulation, I got this idea from her. Check out her discussion of the Chalcedonian definition in Tanner, Jesus, Humanity and the Trinity.
[3] Fee, 208.
[4] Cf. Fee, 206 for the discussion of harpagmos, which seems even more difficult to translate than kenosis.
[5] Fee, 208.
[6] Fee, 210.
[7] Fee, 211.
[8] Here is how Fee sums up his argument: “In Christ Jesus God has thus shown his true nature; this is what it means for Christ to be ‘equal with God’—to pour himself out for the sake of others and to do so by taking the role of a slave. Hereby he not only reveals the character of God, but from the perspective of the present context also reveals what it means for us to be created in God’s image, to bear his likeness and have his ‘mindset.’ It means taking the role of the slave for the sake of others…” (Fee, 214.)

C. S. Lewis

     This past summer I taught a class on C. S. Lewis. A graduating student had seen this class listed in the academic catalogue and asked me if I would teach it. I said yes with a little reluctance. Though I had read all of Lewis' fiction before, I had rarely read with much attention or care his non-fiction works.  


     I have to admit that I have been suspicious of how people (evangelicals in particular) say the name of Lewis with such reverence. "Well, as C. S. Lewis once said..." He is the 'thinking Christian's' patron saint and the champion of wisdom over knowledge. Oh, and everyone likes to read about talking animals. 


     Regardless of my previous prejudices, Lewis completely won me over. He is remarkably insightful and wisely subversive. When I say subversive I mean that he sees into the culture (both Christian and secular) and knows how to subtly deconstruct previous ways of understanding and then reframe the conversation with wit and depth. 


     What also surprised me was the relevancy of his voice. Even though he died in 1963, he addresses the same issues as students today wrestle to understand. I think part of this is because he lived in a culture (20th century war-torn Britain--Lewis fought in WWI and lost his best friend) that struggled with the relevancy of faith. Where was God in the midst of such evil and destruction? Or even, why believe in God when science and philosophy have shown the sheer ridiculousness of Christianity? 


     Despite all of this, Lewis--with the help of such friends as J. R. R. Tolkien and Charles Williams--moved through his own atheism and then deism back to Christianity. This formed his thought and his pursuit for God. He speaks to the sincere yet cynical soul who is not sure if the God of their youth is really viable anymore. How do we pursuit God in an age of cynicism? Lewis seems to know how to lead the way...


     In class I read the very beginning of Lewis' famous sermon, "The Weight of Glory." In this sermon he talks about 'desire.' This is a very important theme for Lewis in his writings. He believed that the telling of stories had the power to awaken desire in the human heart. More specifically he talked about desire as Sehnsucht, that desire and longing for God's presence; a heart sickness for home. For example, Reepicheep, the chief of the mice in The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, had a Sehnsucht for Aslan's country. As a theology teacher, I often wonder what it means to awaken desire for God. Again, Lewis is able to lead the way... 

“If you asked twenty good men to-day what they thought the highest of the virtues, nineteen of them would reply, Unselfishness. But if you asked almost any of the great Christians of old he would have replied, Love. You see what has happened? A negative term has been substituted for a positive, and this is of more than philological importance. The negative ideal of Unselfishness carries with it the suggestion not primarily of securing good things for others, but of going without them ourselves, as if our abstinence and not their happiness was the important point. I do not think this is the Christian virtue of Love. The New Testament has lots to say about self-denial, but not about self-denial as an end in itself. We are told to deny ourselves and to take up our crosses in order that we may follow Christ; and nearly every description of what we shall ultimately find if we do so contains an appeal to desire. If there lurks in most modern minds the notion that to desire our own good and earnestly to hope for the enjoyment of it is a bad thing, I submit that this notion has crept in from Kant and the Stoics and is no part of the Christian faith. Indeed, if we consider the unblushing promises of reward and the staggering nature of the rewards promised in the Gospels, it would seem that Our Lord finds our desires, not too strong, but too weak. We are half-hearted creatures, fooling about with drink and sex and ambition when infinite joy is offered us, like an ignorant child who wants to go on making mud pies in a slum because he cannot imagine what is meant by the offer of a holiday at the sea. We are far too easily pleased.” ("The Weight of Glory")

Shelly Manne - The Beats Go On



In case you were curious about the history of drums, here you go (with a little help from Shelly Manne):



When you play like this, I'd say you are a qualified expert:





Abdullah Ibrahim & Ekaya - African River

For this excellent date, pianist Abdullah Ibrahim performs eight of his compositions with a particularly strong group of players: trombonist Robin Eubanks, John Stubblefield on tenor and flute, Horace Alexander Young switching between soprano, alto and piccolo, Howard Johnson on tuba, baritone and trumpet, bassist Buster Williams and drummer Brian Abrahams. But more important than the individual players are the colorful ensembles and the frequently memorable compositions. Highlights include "African River," "Sweet Samba," "Duke 88" and a beautiful version of "The Wedding." - by Scott Yanow, AMG

Artist: Abdullah Ibrahim (aka. Dollar Brand) & Ekaya
Album: African River
Year: 1989
Quality: eac-flac, cue, log, artw.
Label: Enja
Total time: 45:38

Tracks:
1.  Toi-Toi 3:30 
2.  African River 9:47 
3.  Joan - Capetown Flower 5:50 
4.  Chisa 4:27 
5.  Sweet Samba 5:56 
6.  Duke 88 8:31 
7.  The Wedding 3:59 
8.  The Mountain of the Night 3:34 
All compositions by Abdullah Ibrahim

Personnel:
Abdullah Ibrahim (Dollar Brand) (Piano)
Robin Eubanks (Trombone)
John Stubblefield (Flute, Tenor Saxophone and Piccolo)
Horace Alexander Young (Soprano and Alto Saxophone, Piccolo)
Howard Johnson (Tuba, Trumpet and Baritone Saxophone)
Buster Williams (Double Bass)
Brian Adams (Drums)

Kip Hanrahan - Vertical's Currency

Sting founded the Pangea label in the mid-'80s, unearthing some important and overlooked recordings from the defunct American Clave catalogue, much to the delight of ears lucky enough to hear (as a side note, some of tango sensation Astor Piazolla's most important work would be lost were it not for the mining of such treasure). Such is the case for Kip Hanrahan, a soulful, New York-based percussionist and producer who unleashed two particularly fantastic albums -- Days and Nights of Blue Luck Inverted and Vertical's Currency -- a lush, sensuous Afro-Cubano feast for the ears that is so warm as to engulf the listener with flames. There is a wonderful spirit to "Shadow Song," an instantly recognizable anthem of Ricky Ricardo cliché that roars with boisterous horn arrangements, congas, cowbells, and vocals of uncanny, third-person self-analysis: "Today I have these blues that are wittier than me/That jokes with my girlfriend while drinking my rum." "Smiles and Grins" follows with tight polyrhythms that snap and clap along with syncopated piano clusters, as vocalist Jack Bruce hurriedly lilts beat poetry through the chord changes that only twice pause for contemplation. Elsewhere in the disc there is an element of sultry longing and hot Miami sunsets, as with "Two Heartedly, To the Other Side," "Make Love 2," and "Dark (Kip's Tune)." It is with this all-star cast of the New York underground jazz fusion scene that Hanrahan finds such rich moods, textures, and symbiosis. Steve Swallow on the bass rarely disappoints, and both guitarist/avant-gardist Arto Lidsay and keyboardist Peter Scherer, who together comprise the group Ambitious Lovers, fill out the room with equally reliable musicianship. Vertical's Currency overflows with rich contributions in an organic stew of worldly fusion that slinks through the city streets after hours. Find this album and pounce on it. - by Keir Langley, AMG

Artist: Kip Hanrahan
Album: Vertical's Currency
Year: 1984
Label: American Clavé
Total time: 40:33

Tracks:
1.  A Small Map of Heaven 5:21 
2.  Shadow Song (Mario's In) 4:05 
3.  Smiles and Grins 3:09 
4.  Two Heartedly. To the Other Side 3:12 
5.  Chances Are Good (Baden's Distance) 5:12 
6.  Make Love 2 4:27 
7.  One Casual Song (After Another) 3:09 
8.  Intimate Distances (Jack's Margaret's Natasha) 3:00 
9.  Describing it To Yourself as Convex 4:17 
10.  What Do You Think? That This Mountain Was Once On Fire? 1:41 
11.  Dark (Kip's Tune) 2:55 

Personnel:
Kip Hanrahan (Percussion)
Ignacio Berroa (Trap Drums)
Jack Bruce (Vocals, Bass Guitar and Piano)
Milton Cardona (Congas, Bongos)
Arto Lindsay (Electric Guitar)
David Murray (Tenor Saxophone)
Puntilla Orlando Rios (Quinto, Congas)
Peter Scherer (Synclavier and Organ)
Steve Swallow (Bass Guitar)
Anton Fier (Trap Drums) - 3,6
Friesner Augustin (Tambou, Quinto) - 7,8
Elysee Pyronneau (Electric Guitar) - 7
Olufemi Claudette Mitchell (Chekere) - 1
Mario Rivera (Baritone Saxophone) - 2
Ned Rothenberg (Tenor Saxophone) - 2
Richie Vitale (Trumpet) - 2
Lew Soloff (Trumpet) - 2
Nancy Weiss (Vocals) - 11

Joe Locke & Edmar Castaneda



Normally I would highly recommend checking out both of these artists on any day on whatever recordings you can find (they are both outstanding musicians - complete virtuoso's with dynamic individual voices). Fortunately for us here they are creating some great music together:





Hey, I'm co-hosting the jam session at the Beatniq Jazz & Social Club tomorrow evening starting at 9:00pm with guitarist Ralf Buschmeyer and bassist Wes Caswell.

Come on by, sit in for a few tunes and say hello !

The Ralf Buschmeyer Trio hosts the Beatniq Jam Session

Thursday, January 20th 9:00pm
The Beatniq Jazz & Social Club
811 - 1st Street SW
Calgary, Alberta

Ralf is one of Western Canada's guitar greats and a consummate musician. His influences range from Grant Green & Wes Montgomery to Lorne Lofsky, Ed Bickert, Mike Stern, Pat Metheny and John Scofield. Ralf can swing hard and then rock out when it counts. It's always a pleasure to play with Ralf and it will be for sure a fun night of music ahead of us tomorrow evening. Don't miss it!

Information Dissemination: Update on Supermanliness

Over the weekend I received an e-mail from the grandson of Lieutenant Cyrus Hall, whose WWI prisoner-of-war interrogation I shared here.Lieutenant Hall, a Canadian serving in the RAF, was captured following the collapse of his aircraft in no man's land in 1918.The documents I had admission to (at the National Archive near Kew Garden) gave no reading of his eventual fate.

is grandson sent me an obituary, indicating that he returned to Canada, had a successful career, and made a full part to the second war: He flew with such famed aces as Nigger Horn [ed. his very nickname, apparently], Elliott White Springs, Jimmie McCudden, Billy Barker and of form the legendary Bishop against Baron Richthofen's Flying Circus. He is mentioned in many books about those early flying days including Springs' "Above the Bright Blue Sky" and Bishop's biography, The Bravery of the Early Morning". In April, 1918 his SE 53 suffered engine failure and he was constrained to earth in no-man's land where he waS taken prisoner. Wounded twice, he exhausted the remaining seven months of the war as a P.O.W. in Germany.When hostilities again broke out in September, 1939, he immediately volunteered for active duty but was rejected at first because of a hearing disability. He then spent the first two months of the wa~ recruiting the Cameron Highlanders up to force on his own time before being recognized for active duty with the place of Major. His greatest disappointment was that he was not able to go overseas with his regiment because of his hearing problem. Thousands of Canadian servicemen who passed through the District Depot in Ottawa on their way to and from overseas will remember him as both 2nd in control and acting Officer Commanding at Lansdowne Park. Many enlisted men who served under him will recall the cigarettes and parcels that he sent to them overseas. Major Hall was one of the few soldiers in the Canadian Army who was priveleged to assume Royal Air Force Wings on his army uniform in World War II.After the war, Mr. Hall rejoined the Government Annuities Branch, Ottawa, then in 1950 moved to Grimsby Beach vihere he and Mrs. Hall became fruit farmers. However, he maintained his connection with the Annuities Branch and worked out of both the St. Catharines and Hamilton offices. He then moved to Hamilton in 1957 and eventually retired permanently in 1965 at the age of 71.And a bleg; embarrassingly, I failed to pen down the details of the folder where I plant the German POW report.I give an estimate of where it is, but I'm not 100% certain.If any readers are planning to call the National Archive anytime soon, I love that Major Hall's family would greatly appreciate a transcript of the report.Please drop me an e-mail if you get a chance.

Mark E Music Photos: Information Dissemination: Update on .

scan0001 Information Dissemination: Update on SupermanlinessOver the weekend I received an e-mail from the grandson of Lieutenant Cyrus Hall, whose WWI prisoner-of-war interrogation I shared here.Lieutenant Hall, a Canadian serving in the RAF, was captured following the crash of his aircraft in no man's land in 1918.The documents I had access to (at the National Archive near Kew Garden) gave no indication of his eventual fate.

is grandson sent me an obituary, indicating that he returned to Canada, had a successful career, and made a good share to the second war: He flew with such famed aces as Nigger Horn [ed. his very nickname, apparently], Elliott White Springs, Jimmie McCudden, Billy Barker and of work the legendary Bishop against Baron Richthofen's Flying Circus. He is mentioned in many books about those early flying days including Springs' "Above the Bright Blue Sky" and Bishop's biography, The Bravery of the Early Morning". In April, 1918 his SE 53 suffered engine failure and he was constrained to land in no-man's land where he waS taken prisoner. Wounded twice, he spent the remaining seven months of the war as a P.O.W. in Germany.When hostilities again broke out in September, 1939, he immediately volunteered for active duty but was rejected at first because of a hearing disability. He then spent the beginning two months of the wa~ recruiting the Cameron Highlanders up to drive on his own time before being recognised for active duty with the point of Major. His greatest disappointment was that he was not capable to go overseas with his regiment because of his hearing problem. Thousands of Canadian servicemen who passed through the District Depot in Ottawa on their way to and from overseas will commend him as both 2nd in control and acting Officer Commanding at Lansdowne Park. Many enlisted men who served under him will remember the cigarettes and parcels that he sent to them overseas. Major Hall was one of the few soldiers in the Canadian Army who was priveleged to bear Royal Air Force Wings on his army uniform in World War II.After the war, Mr. Hall rejoined the Government Annuities Branch, Ottawa, then in 1950 moved to Grimsby Beach vihere he and Mrs. Hall became fruit farmers. However, he retained his association with the Annuities Branch and worked out of both the St. Catharines and Hamilton offices. He then moved to Hamilton in 1957 and finally retired permanently in 1965 at the age of 71.And a bleg; embarrassingly, I failed to pen down the details of the folder where I plant the German POW report.I have an idea of where it is, but I'm not 100% certain.If any readers are planning to predict the National Archive anytime soon, I know that Major Hall's family would greatly appreciate a copy of the report.Please drop me an e-mail if you get a chance.

Stations forced to mute certain 'lyrics' - The Sault Star .

Stations forced to mute certain 'lyrics'Local NewsBy FRANK DOBROVNIK, THE SAULT STARPosted 10 hours ago

The final time listeners will suffer always heard Dire Straits' Money for Nothing in its original work on EZ Rock was two weeks ago; the future time, it will receive the word "faggot" muted.

A ruling last week by the Canadian Broadcast Standards Council bans the country's 700-plus radio stations from performing the 25-year-old song because of repeated use of the word, including the Sault Ste.

Marie, Ont. station. They will stand by the opinion and air an edited version, because "it's too full of a strain not to play," said general manager Scott Sexsmith. "If it means playing an edited version, so be it. I'd sooner do that than not bring it at all."

While the station's official status is that it's "here to keep the CBSC," Sexsmith said at least one listener expressed his unhappiness about the ruling.

"I had one call today, from someone asking why the ruling went the way it did. But it's not our property to judge," he said Monday.

The CBSC has faced a choir of critics, including the set itself. Dire Straits keyboardist Guy Fletcher joined on his website Friday, calling the ruling "outrageous" and the council's decision "hilarious" for having lost the charge of the band's song about homophobia.

"WHAT a blow of paper," he wrote of the decision. "Canada will now be constrained to ban all Rap music since the 'N' word is expressed in most recordings."

The conclusion was prompted by a charge from a single listener, identified as a member of the gay/lesbian/bisexual and transgender community.

While Canadian stations may no longer represent the song uncut, those based in the United States and stretch into Canada such as Rock 101 in the Michigan Sault face no such restrictions. Operations manager Mark SanAngelo expressed surprise a generally benign British band has been singled out amid all the potentially offensive music produced in the last 40 years.

"There are a lot of songs out there that are often more vivid than a 30-year-old Dire Straits song," said SanAngelo. " 'Faggot' is surely an objectionable word, and surely not one I'd use in my own language, but I'm not in the job of censoring artists. "

At the same time, the station plays "clean" versions of many popular current songs, with swear words replaced, including by Canada's Nickelback. "We do endeavour to play edited versions of songs, because there's a lot of curse words in a lot of songs that weren't there when I started 25 years ago," he said.

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Mark E Music Photos: Stations forced to mute certain 'lyrics .

Stations forced to mute certain 'lyrics'Local NewsBy FRANK DOBROVNIK, THE SAULT STARPosted 10 hours ago

The last time listeners will have always heard Dire Straits' Money for Zero in its original form on EZ Rock was two weeks ago; the next time, it will have the word "faggot" muted.

A ruling last week by the Canadian Broadcast Standards Council bans the country's 700-plus radio stations from playing the 25-year-old song because of repeated use of the word, including the Sault Ste.

Marie, Ont. station. They will abide by the ruling and air an edited version, because "it's too broad of a song not to play," said general manager Scott Sexsmith. "If it means playing an edited version, so be it. I'd rather do that than not take it at all."

While the station's official position is that it's "here to prevent the CBSC," Sexsmith said at least one listener expressed his unhappiness about the ruling.

"I had one call today, from someone asking why the ruling went the way it did. But it's not our place to judge," he said Monday.

The CBSC has faced a chorus of critics, including the set itself. Dire Straits keyboardist Guy Fletcher joined on his website Friday, calling the ruling "outrageous" and the council's decision "hilarious" for having missed the point of the band's song about homophobia.

"WHAT a blast of paper," he wrote of the decision. "Canada will now be forced to ban all Rap music since the 'N' word is uttered in most recordings."

The decision was prompted by a commission from a single listener, identified as a member of the gay/lesbian/bisexual and transgendered community.

While Canadian stations may no longer be the song uncut, those based in the United States and extend into Canada such as Rock 101 in the Michigan Sault face no such restrictions. Operations manager Mark SanAngelo expressed surprise a generally benign British band has been singled out amid all the potentially offensive music produced in the last 40 years.

"There are a lot of songs out there that are much more intense than a 30-year-old Dire Straits song," said SanAngelo. " 'Faggot' is certainly an objectionable word, and certainly not one I'd use in my own language, but I'm not in the job of censoring artists. "

At the same time, the station plays "clean" versions of many popular current songs, with swear words replaced, including by Canada's Nickelback. "We do attempt to play edited versions of songs, because there's a lot of curse words in a lot of songs that weren't there when I started 25 years ago," he said.

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